トップページ商品カテゴリ一覧お支払・配送について運営者の紹介お問い合わせ会員登録カートの中
Halo
Johnson Creek
eVo
FlavourArt
Eleaf
BI-SO
Dekang
HANGSEN
HANGBOO
Kanger Tech
Kamry
BIANSI
Vision
FlySmoker
パーツ・アクセサリ


会員専用ページ
メールアドレス
パスワード

商品カテゴリ

ニコチン濃度の選択方法
ニコチン濃度換算表のウソ・ホント
紙巻煙草のニコチン・タール量のウソ・ホント
近年人気のフレーバー

携帯サイト
スマホサイト

支払方法一覧




今日、2百万人以上の英国人が定常的に電子タバコを使用している

2014年4月28日

電子タバコの広告についてのASAの協議が終了する日に、健康慈善団体ASHによって発表された数字は、英国成人の電子タバコの使用が2012年の推定700,000ユーザーから2014年には210万ユーザーまで増え、過去2年で3倍になったことを明らかにしている。

電子タバコユーザーの3分の2近くが喫煙者であり、そして3分の1が元喫煙者である。元喫煙者の割合の増加は前年に匹敵している。

繰り返しになるが、現在の自己申告の非喫煙者間の電子タバコの使用はごくわずかであり(0.1%)、また非喫煙者のおよそ1%だけが今までに電子タバコを試したことがあると言っている。

ASHに委託されたYouGovによる調査によると、過去4年にわたり電子タバコを試した現喫煙者と元喫煙者数は劇的な増加を示している。

2010年には、現喫煙者と元喫煙者の8.2パーセントが過去に電子タバコを試していた。

2014年までに、この数字は51.7パーセントに上昇した。

定期的に電子タバコを使用する現喫煙者の数は、2010年の2.7パーセントから2014年の17.7パーセントまで、一貫して上昇している。

英国成人の3分の1強(35%)が、電子タバコは公衆衛生に良いと信じている。しかし、約4分の1(22%)はこれに賛成していない。

ASH YouGov調査は初めて、よく使用される電子タバコの種類を調査した。

電子タバコユーザーの2分の1以上が、充填済みニコチン入りリキッドのカートリッジと再充電可能な電子タバコで使用を開始した。 4分の1だけが、ニコチン入りリキッドタンクと電子タバコで使用を開始した。

しかし、現ユーザーの間ではこの割合はより均等に分かれ、47%が主に充填済みニコチン入りリキッドのカートリッジと再充電可能な電子タバコを使用し、そして41%が別個のニコチン入りリキッドタンクと再充電可能な装置を使っている。

20%だけが使い捨ての電子タバコで使用を開始した。そして8%だけが、現在も主に使い捨ての電子タバコを使っている。

電子タバコを使用し、あるいは試す理由について、現喫煙者と元喫煙者は様々な理由を述べている。

電子タバコの現在のユーザー:

− 元喫煙者の主な理由は「完全な禁煙を支援する手段として」(71%)、そして「タバコから離れる手段として」(48%)である。

− 現喫煙者の主な理由は「完全な禁煙ではなく、タバコの量を減らす手段として」(48%)、続いて「従来のタバコと比較してお金を節約すること」(37%)、「完全な禁煙を支援する手段として」(36%)である。

健康慈善団体ASHの最高経営責任者Deborah Arnottは以下のように述べた。


「この4年にわたる電子タバコ使用の劇的な増加は、喫煙者が喫煙を減らす、あるいは禁煙を支援する手段として、この電子タバコにますます関心を向けていることを示している。


非喫煙者間の使用はごくわずかなままであることがはっきりしている。

しかしながら、子供たちと非喫煙者がターゲットにされないことを確実にするために、電子タバコの広告を規制することが重要である。我々の研究では、電子タバコが喫煙の入り口の役割を果たすという証拠は無い。

英国で別に進行中の喫煙ツールの研究でもまた、禁煙を支援する手段として喫煙者がますます電子タバコを使用し、ニコチンパッチやニコチンガムのようなニコチン医薬品の使用を追い抜いたことが明らかになった。

昨年禁煙した喫煙者の割合は増加し、英国の喫煙率は低下し続けている。

研究のリーダーであるロバート・ウェスト教授は調査結果について以下のようにコメントした。


「電子タバコの使用が再度の喫煙につながるという主張があるが、これを支持する証拠は発見できない。それどころか、もっと多くの人々が禁煙を支援する手段として電子タバコを使用すれば、喫煙を減らす助けになるかもしれない。」



英語原文 Over 2 million Britons now regularly use electronic cigarettes

Monday 28 April 2014

Figures released by health charity ASH on the day the ASA’s consultation on the advertising of electronic cigarettes closes reveal that usage of electronic cigarettes among adults in Britain has tripled over the past two years from an estimated 700,000 users in 2012 to 2.1 million in 2014.

Nearly two-thirds of users are smokers and one third are ex-smokers, an increase in the proportion of ex-smokers compared to previous years.

Once again, current use of electronic cigarettes amongst self-reported non-smokers is negligible (0.1%) and only around 1% of never smokers report ever trying electronic cigarettes.

The YouGov survey, commissioned by ASH, reveals a dramatic rise in the number of current and ex-smokers who have tried electronic cigarettes over the past four years.

In 2010, only 8.2 per cent of current or ex-smokers had ever tried electronic cigarettes.

By 2014, this figure had risen to 51.7 per cent.

There has been a consistent rise in the number of current smokers who use electronic cigarettes on a regular basis from 2.7 per cent in 2010 to 17.7 per cent in 2014.

Just over a third (35%) of British adults believe that electronic cigarettes are good for public health while around a quarter (22%) disagree.

For the first time, the ASH YouGov survey asked about the type of electronic cigarette commonly used.

Over a half of electronic cigarette users started off using rechargeable electronic cigarettes with prefilled cartridges, with only one in four starting by using cigarettes with a tank or reservoir.

But amongst current users the balance is more evenly split with 47% most often using rechargeable e-cigarettes with prefilled cartridges and 41% using rechargeable devices with a separate tank.


Only 20% started off using disposable electronic cigarettes and only 8% most often use disposable e-cigs currently.


There are a variety of reasons given by current and ex-smokers for why they use or have tried electronic cigarettes. Among current users of electronic cigarettes:

・ The main reasons given by ex-smokers are “to help me stop smoking entirely” (71%) and “to help me keep off tobacco” (48%).

・ The main reason given by current smokers is to “help me reduce the amount of tobacco I smoke, but not stop completely” (48%) followed by “to save money compared with smoking tobacco” (37%); and “to help me stop smoking entirely” (36%).

Deborah Arnott, Chief Executive of health charity ASH said:


“The dramatic rise in use of electronic cigarettes over the past four years suggests that smokers are increasingly turning to these devices to help them cut down or quit smoking.


Significantly, usage among non-smokers remains negligible.

While it is important to control the advertising of electronic cigarettes to make sure children and non-smokers are not being targeted, there is no evidence from our research that e-cigarettes are acting as a gateway into smoking.”

A separate ongoing survey - the Smoking Toolkit Study carried out in England - has also found that smokers are increasingly using electronic cigarettes as an aid to quitting, overtaking use of medicinal nicotine products such as patches and gum.

The proportion of smokers who have quit in the last year has increased and smoking rates in England are continuing to fall.


Commenting on the findings, leader of the study, Professor Robert West, said:

“Despite claims that use of electronic cigarettes risks renormalizing smoking, we found no evidence to support this view. On the contrary, electronic cigarettes may be helping to reduce smoking as more people use them as an aid to quitting.”

Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (“E-cigarettes”) Review of Safety and Smoking Cessation Efficacy 6. Paul Truman Harrell, PhD1 7. Vani Nath Simmons, PhD1 8. John Bernard Correa1 9. Tapan Ashvin Padhya, MD2 10. Thomas Henry Brandon, PhD1

Background and Objectives Cigarette

smoking is common among cancer patients and is associated with negative outcomes. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (“e-cigarettes”) are rapidly growing in popularity and use, but there is limited information on their safety or effectiveness in helping individuals quit smoking.

Data Sources

The authors searched PubMed, Web of Science, and additional sources for published empirical data on safety and use of electronic cigarettes as an aid to quit smoking.

Review

Methods We conducted a structured search of the current literature up to and including November 2013.

Results

E-cigarettes currently vary widely in their contents and are sometimes inconsistent with labeling. Compared to tobacco cigarettes, available evidence suggests that e-cigarettes are often substantially lower in toxic content, cytotoxicity, associated adverse effects, and secondhand toxicity exposure. Data on the use of e-cigarettes for quitting smoking are suggestive but ultimately inconclusive.

Conclusions

Clinicians are advised to be aware that the use of e-cigarettes, especially among cigarette smokers, is growing rapidly. These devices are unregulated, of unknown safety, and of uncertain benefit in quitting smoking.

Implications for Practice

In the absence of further data or regulation, oncologists are advised to discuss the known and unknown safety and efficacy information on e-cigarettes with interested patients and to encourage patients to first try FDA-approved pharmacotherapies for smoking cessation.